On The Journey

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“And when you discover what you’re going to be in life, set out to do it as if God Almighty called you at this particular moment in history to do it.” 

-Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

I am a writer. At different times in my life, I proudly recognized this vocation. As a high school student and early in college, all I did was write- mostly sports articles for my school’s newspapers and a local weekly paper.

I left that vocation in search of a more-meaning-making experience in the form of counseling. Always interested by spirituality, I soon found my home in ministry,  utilizing my sharpened counseling skills as I walked with youth and young adults. From time to time, I would use my writing skills, but it always took the back seat to more pressing matters.

Over time, I played with blogs and creative writing. During calmer times of the year, I focused my writing related to my ministry. Book proposals and rejection letters would come and go. Blogs would start and end as life took me down different, blessed roads.

When Lent started in early March, it was not my intention to write a daily post on Facebook. It just happened. And it happened every day for 40-days. It was a vulnerable practice as I revealed insights, convictions, pleas for compassion, and life lessons.

While I shared this core of myself with some in the past in conversations, and in different blogs and posts, this type of sharing was not comfortable. I heard internally defeating thoughts, doubt and questions, and the  famous scriptural words, “one cannot be a prophet in his hometown (Luke 4:16-30).”

God provided reassurance. Many friends, some closer than others, would thank me for the “Lenten Thought of the Day.” Their encouragement, gratitude, and most of all, the impact of my words on their lives, was what I needed to not only post every day, but to find my voice.

Due to some unforeseen personal events, and my own preparation, I am different. Continuing to evolve, and very far from perfect (which isn’t a realistic goal anyway), I do have a voice and something to say.

In my Lenten practice, themes emerged:

  1. The unconditional love of God, and our tendency to not fully honor and trust this love.
  2. The need for us to use our God-given gifts and talents to benefit others, especially most in need.
  3. The world is divided, people are more focused on being right instead of listening, and learning. We must listen more and speak less.
  4. The poor, those on the margins, those who have no voice or a limited voice, those who are wounded, need our energy, our creativity, our care, and our love. Not just any love, but God’s love.
  5. We, all of us, even the strangers in your midst, are wonderfully made. How do we own that and remind others at the same time?

This blog, and my past and future writings will continue to be one contribution to address these themes, among others. As Dr. King told a graduating high school class over four decades ago, “when you discover what you’re going to be in life, set out to do it as if God Almighty called you at this particular moment in history to do it.”

Join me as I set out to better live this vocation, and I pray as a result you too can better live out your vocations to better reflect the love of our God.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One Comment on “On The Journey

  1. I identify so much with your writing, your ideas, your themes. Thank you for adding clarity to some of my thoughts. I especially pondered and adopted this theme: “The poor, those on the margins, those who have no voice or a limited voice, those who are wounded, need our energy, our creativity, our care, and our love. Not just any love, but God’s love.” That summarizes one of my life purposes… Thank you for articulating it so clearly for me.

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